20 NEW TREATMENTS RESTORE LOST HEARING

Over 20 treatments for hearing loss and tinnitus are currently being tested in clinical trials.

 

Treatments that regenerate hearing

 

Last month, Frequency Therapeutics announced that its regenerative therapy for hearing loss had progressed to Phase I/II of clinical trials. Frequency Therapeutics is a US-based company developing a drug called FX-322. This drug has the potential to repair the damaged inner ear by regenerating the Inner Ear hair cells and restoring hearing.

Hair cells transform sound into electric signals that the brain understands and are frequently damaged or lost in sensorineural hearing loss. At the end of 2017, Frequency “Therapeutics” finished an initial test in a small group of people showing that the drug was safe. They are now progressing to test how well the drug restores hearing, and how safe it is, in a larger number of people. READ MORE

Hearing speech in noise update

MACHINE LEARNING software is available for some brands and models of hearing aids and more great improvements are promising. What is machine Learning?

Real-world applications of machine learning:

  • “Google search”
  • Recommendation engines on services like “Netflix” and”Spotify”
  • “Fastest route” suggestions on “Google Maps”
  • Providing ETA estimates on ride-sharing apps like “Uber”
  • Providing delivery estimates on food delivery apps like “UberEATS”
  • Fraud detection in payment systems (like “PayPal”) and finance
  • Medical diagnosis in clinically-complex cases
  • Drug prescription assistants
  • Identifying tumors and skin cancer
  • Spam filtering on popular email clients like “Gmail”
  • Speech recognition (“Google, Alexa, Siri”, etc)
  • Self-driving cars
  • Facial recognition used by “Facebook” and to detect criminals, etc
  • Robots that help care for the elderly
  • Automatic closed captioning for spoken word and sign language
  • Hearing aid performance optimization

Better hearing in background noise

As any experienced hearing aid user knows, hearing in background noise is extremely difficult. Solving the background noise problem is elusive and while there have been a number of technological innovations since the dawn of digital hearing aids (like the directional microphone), only incremental progress has been made in providing a solution.

Over the past few years, DeLiang Wang – a researcher out of Ohio State University – has been working on using machine learning and “deep neural networks” to help make it easier to hear a conversational partner in background noise. Wang’s software enables listeners (with normal hearing and hearing loss) to hear significantly better in background noise.

“People in both groups showed a big improvement (link to complete report)  in their ability to comprehend sentences amid noise after the sentences were processed through our program. People with hearing impairment could decipher only 29 percent of words muddled by babble without the program, but they understood 84 percent after the processing”.

Incorporating Wang’s software into a hearing aid would almost certainly revolutionize hearing aid technology, but unfortunately the software is not on the market yet. Based on the following statement, we can safely assume that there will be a significant wait before this technology will be available to consumers.

“Eventually, we believe the program could be trained on powerful computers and embedded directly into a hearing aid, or paired with a smartphone via a wireless link, such as Bluetooth, to feed the processed signal in real time to an earpiece.”

Improved Sound Quality and Greater Listening Comfort

While the solution to background noise is still over the horizon, real progress has been made on improving sound quality and listening comfort through machine learning. The results of a recent double-blind study suggest that machine-learning can assist hearing aid users in more effectively finding their ideal sound settings; sound settings that lead to greater sound quality and listening comfort in a variety of difficult listening settings.

What’s next for machine-learning hearing aids? We don’t know for sure, but we probably won’t see the next real advance for hearing aid users until machine-learning computations can be performed on the hearing aid itself (and that could take a long while). Once hearing aids are capable of super-computer computations – without the assistance of smartphones – we should be getting very close to a real-time speech-in-noise solution; a technology that should help you to finally hear better in background noise.

Cochlear Implant update

A research team at the University Medical Center Gottingen has created a cochlear implant that uses light to restore auditory responses in deaf gerbils. The study provides a proof-of-concept that combining optical stimulation with genetic manipulation can successfully restore sound perception, and could lead to a new generation of more accurate cochlear implants.

Approximately 360 million people worldwide have hearing impairment. Traditional cochlear implants can partially restore the ability to hear in many of these patients by stimulating ear cells with electrical signals. In such devices, however, the generated current tends to spread around each point of contact, activation of a large population of neurons and limiting the resolution and clarity of sound signals. 

Christian Wrobel and colleagues tackled this obstacle by designing a light-based cochlear implant. Optical stimulation promises spatially confined activation of neurons in the auditory nerve, potentially yielding spatially precise ear cell stimulation with limited spreading.

Tinnitus Drug Trial has disappointing resuls

ZUG, SWITZERLAND — Bio-pharmaceutical company Auris Medical Holdings announced disappointing results from its TACTT3 clinical trial for its promising tinnitus drug candidate, Keyzilen.  Preliminary top-line data from the trial indicate that the study did not provide a statistically significant improvement in the Tinnitus Functional Score from baseline to Day 84 in the active treated group compared to placebo.

The company’s investigative drug, Keyzilen, is an esketamine gel for intratympanic injection, intended for acute peripheral tinnitus following cochlear injury or otitis media in adults. The drug received Fast Track designation from the FDA last year, which helps expedite the review process.

Value of the company’s stock dropped drastically this week, following the news.

Pharmaceutical Treatment of Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

Several startup companies, including those backed by major pharmaceutical companies, are focused on discovering ways to treat hearing loss, tinnitus and other ear-related disorders. As much promise has been shown in potential drug treatments or therapies to treat these disorders, researchers face many challenges to developing an effective treatment.

The failure of the Keyzilen tinnitus drug is, unfortunately, not the first disappointment for Auris Medical. In the fall of 2017, just weeks after Otonomy announced that it was cutting staff and suspending further clinical trials due to poor results from its Meniere’s drug trial, the company announced that it was terminating a late-stage study to treat sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) with its investigational drug, AM-111.

With the company’s share price under significant pressure, Auris shareholders held an extraordinary general meeting on March 12 and it was agreed that the company will merge with one of its subsidiaries, resulting in a stock split. Auris said in a statement that will be investigating the outcomes, including those in a previously conducted TACTT2 trial, and will provide an update soon.

Source:  Auris Medical Announces Disappointing Results from Tinnitus Drug,  March 16, 2018

How To Choose A Restaurant When You Have a Hearing Loss

How To Choose A Restaurant When You Have Hearing Loss

03/06/2017 12:53 pm ET

My favorite restaurant recently underwent a large renovation. It was necessary, as the place definitely needed an update, but I was crushed. This restaurant was my family’s haven from noise. Every Friday night, almost without fail, we enjoyed a quiet, stress free, delicious meal in a warm and welcoming atmosphere. And none of us had to worry about my hearing loss. Were we going to have to find a new place?

SNAPPA.IO

The restaurant was old-school Italian. It had carpeting, acoustic tiles, fancy white tablecloths and waiters from Italy. The food was outstanding and the environment was perfect for our family — quiet. Whenever friends or relatives would visit from out of town, we would take them there. We barely even looked at the menu anymore. We didn’t need to.

But then they did the renovation. They removed the carpet and installed hardwood floors. They spiffed up the bar area adding more hard surfaces and swapped some of the cloth wallhangings for framed photos. We noticed the difference right away. The restaurant was now more visually appealing, but it was also no longer as quiet as it used to be.

The good news is that we have adapted and the restaurant has been very accommodating. We are now always seated along the wall or in the corner and they are happy to turn down any music if we ask. The food and warm atmosphere are the same and it remains my family’s safe-haven dining venue. It just requires a little more forward planning to make sure we request a good seat in advance.

This experience highlighted for me the key characteristics of a good restaurant for people with hearing loss and the importance, once again, of advocating for yourself.

Here are my tips for a successful experience when dining out.

1.  Provide information early. Note your desire for a quiet table in your reservation and remind the restaurant if they call to confirm. This gives them a better chance of meeting your needs than if you walk in cold. If they seat you at a less than ideal table at first, ask for a quieter spot. Persistence often pays off.

2. Request a table in the corner. A corner table or other location beside a wall works best since there is a barrier between you and the rest of the restaurant noise. This also eliminates distractions from noise behind you and lets you better focus on the speakers at the table. A booth is also often a good choice if it has high back seats.

3.  Choose restaurants with sound absorbing decor. Carpet, curtains, cushioned chairs, cloth tablecloths and acoustic tiles are my decor of choice. Many restaurants today prefer hard surfaces like glass and wood. Preview the decor online or look for “old school” restaurants which may have a more classic design.

4.  Read online reviews. Many restaurant rating systems now include noise level as one of the criteria. For example, Zagat now has a “Good for Quiet Conversation” search category. I am sure others do as well.

5.  Ask around. I like to trade restaurant tips with my hearing loss friends and also with my hearing friends. Once you hit a certain age, everybody wants a quiet restaurant!

Readers, do you have a go-to quiet restaurant in your neighborhood?

This post first appeared on LivingWithHearingLoss.com.

Hearing aid repair problems

 Most hearing aid repairs are caused by ear wax plugging the sound tube opening. Other cause are dropping it and pets chewing the hearing aid, but most often they chew the ear mold/tip, attracted by the smell and taste of ear wax.  Keeping your hearing aid, ear mold/ tip/ dome clean removes the pet chewing attraction.
Ear wax is warm, moist, and acidic that forms in our ear canal.  It’s purpose is to keep dirt and bugs from getting down in our ears.
If your ear drum is normal and non-perforated, you can flush your ears regularly with an ear wax removal kit, or diluted hydrogen peroxide, or warm water.
Always check with your doctor before doing any type of earwax removal, and do not put anything in your ear if you’ve had surgery, an infection or any other complications of the ear.

Samsung planning hearing aid release

Samsung developing hearing aid with model number SM-R790

Public docs suggest Samsung is working on a hearable entry called the Samsung Earcle, a non-prescription, wireless in-ear device for hands-free messaging, music playback and sound enhancement in hard to hear places. It appears also to be working on a prescription-only Samsung hearing aid, documents reveal …

“aNewDomain “— As the hype around so-called hearable technology continues to build, Samsung appears to be readying Bluetooth-enabled hearing aids and consumer-targeted hearables for U.S. release this year and next, according to sources close to the company and documents available in the public domain.

The wireless Bluetooth device will be capable of enhancing conversation and other sounds in various settings, such as in loud concert halls, noisy restaurants and muted conference rooms, the docs say. The Earcle would also provide some access to such smartphone functions as messaging and playing music, and it would function as a standalone wireless Bluetooth headset, too, they say.

A close examination of the FCC docs around the Earcle non-prescription hearable portrays a product that fits in pretty neatly among the some dozen hearable entries announced at CES 2016.

Scroll below to view all the FCC and Bluetooth docs we found that describe the Samsung Earcle and the Samsung Bluetooth Hearing Aid.

More than a dozen companies have announced hearables — in-ear devices capable of delivering some smartphone functions (like messaging, music playing and fitness samsung earclemonitoring) along with noise-cancellation and sound-enhancement functions via Bluetooth and built-in storage. The Bragi Dash, for instance, purports to offer music playback, messaging, fitness tracking, voice commands and other functions via two, independent ear pieces with no attachments. That firm recently announced that it’s working with hearing-aid maker Starkey. Apple, too, is believed to be working on both a hearing aid and a wireless “airpods” version of its EarPods, sources say, pointing to this trademark application, filed in September 2015.

The Samsung Earcle offering described in the FCC docs we’ve obtained doesn’t appear to be quite as ambitious, design-wise, as most of those efforts. Rather, its an independent earpieces (hearing aid) s that fit behind the ear and has wires that connect to a receiver (speaker) that fits in the ear canal.

This effort appears to be utterly distinct from Samsung efforts to build a Bluetooth hearing aid, as revealed by other public domain documents.

In the Earcle User (draft) manual it sent to the FCC in October, Samsung repeatedly underlines that the Earcle is not designed for hearing-impaired individuals.

Rather, it is “intended to supplement what you hear by amplifying ambient sound … and does not compensate for hearing loss or hearing difficulty.

The docs also contain a description of what Samsung has in mind for the Earcle. In the FCC application, Samsung writes:

The Earcle is … a personal sound amplification product (PSAP) to help you hear better. The Earcle amplifies the sound you hear and can also be used as a Bluetooth headphone. If you connect the Earcle to a mobile device via Bluetooth, you can answer calls and play music from the connected device. If you connect the Earcle to a mobile device via the Samsung Earcle app installed, you can configure the Earcle’s sound settings …”

samsung earcleHowever, just punching the device’s control button, located on the receiver, will let users access five preset audio enhancement settings, which are designed to help users hear better in five places: the car, in meeting rooms, in restaurants, outdoors and in concerts, according to the documentation. See the chart Samsung submitted to the FCC describing this, at left.

The Earcle’s hearing piece, or dome, is retractable and will be available in multiple sizes, the docs reveal.

You can read the whole set of Samsung FCC filings below.

In addition to the Earcle, Samsung also appears to be readying its so-called Samsung Bluetooth Hearing Aid. Find its applications to the Bluetooth SIG below, too.

Below is the draft documentation Samsung submitted for its planned hearable product, the Earcle. Scroll down for images, tech specs and other documentation describing the Earcle and the Samsung hearing aid in the public domain.

Samsung Earcle (Draft Docs for FCC)

Here are the external photos of the Samsung Earcle, as submitted in the same application last year.

Samsung Earcle External Photos (FCC Application)

Below are the Samsung Earcle internal photos, as submitted by Samsung to the FCC in its application in 2015.

Samsung Earcle Internal Photos (FCC Application)

Here are the test setup photos Samsung submitted to the FCC for its Samsung Earcle application.

Samsung Earcle Test Setup Photos (FCC Application)

In addition to the non-prescription  Earcle, Samsung appears also to be working on a low-power Bluetooth hearing aid. Below are the test results Samsung sent the FCC as part of its application.

Samsung Bluetooth Hearing Aid Test Results (FCC Application)

Samsung has filed for patents under the hearing aid designation, USPTO records show. Here is a granted patent for “small hearing aid” technology.

Samsung Small Hearing Aid Patent

Hearing Aids with Bluetooth Technology

Hearing Aids Make Use of Bluetooth Technology

The primary goal of hearing aids has always been to improve speech understanding. While this hasn’t changed, hearing aid manufacturers are now building Bluetooth technology into their most advanced hearing aid microchips to make speech from phones, televisions, and other devices more accessible to hearing aid users.

Made For iPhone (MFi) hearing aids, which rely on Bluetooth technology, first appeared on the market way back in 2014. The introduction of MFi ushered in a wireless revolution for hearing aid users, allowing – for the first time – a direct wireless connection between phone and hearing aid, and for many, the first clear mobile phone call with hearing loss.

Up until recently MFi has been the only option for hearing aid users wanting built-in Bluetooth technology. This meant no Bluetooth for Android users, and no direct connectivity to non-Apple devices. MFi hearing aids have also never offered true hands-free calling; having the mobile phone close by when speaking, or carrying a remote-microphone accessory, has been required.

Fortunately, there are now more options on the market, and with the release of the “Made For All” Phonak Audéo B-Direct late last year, Android users and hands-free callers with hearing loss have had their prayers answered. Here are the top three innovations that Phonak Audéo B-Direct has introduced to the market:

1. Hearing aids can now directly connect to any Bluetooth-enabled phone.

According to Dr. Elizabeth Thompson, director of business development and veterans affairs at Phonak, previous generations of hearing aids could only directly connect to an iPhone, which greatly limited people’s options.

Pew Research Center found only 33 percent of American smartphone owners used an iPhone while a whopping 66 percent used the Android operating system,” said Thompson. “Another study showed 38 percent of all Americans over age 65 still use a classic flip phone. Until now, there has never been a Bluetooth hearing aid that was truly made for all devices and allowed universal connectivity — including the ability to directly connect to an iPhone, an Android device or even a classic flip phone that is Bluetooth-ready.”

2. Bluetooth hearing aids now offer truly hands-free calls.

Built-in microphones on Audéo B-Direct hearing aids feature automatic voice pickup, allowing people to have two-way conversations through their hearing aids. Thompson stated this is the first time this has ever been done with hearing aids.

“This is indeed the first time a hearing aid wearer can have a true hands-free conversation without having to touch the phone at all,” she said. “This is especially convenient in the car, where your phone may be in a pocket or purse, or if you need to have a conversation while leaving your phone on the table or countertop, for example if you’re cooking.”

3. Hearing aids stream wireless stereo sound directly from your TV.

According to research firm Statista, Americans spend an average of 4.5 hours per day watching TV. And if you have or live with someone who has hearing loss, you probably know that sometimes the volume of the TV can become an issue.

“With a card-sized TV Connector, hearing aid wearers simply plug the device into the back of the TV,” added Thompson. “The ‘plug and play’ TV Connector instantly pairs with the hearing aids, allowing viewers to stream high-fidelity TV-sound in stereo at their preferred volume level, independent of other viewers. Wearers have reported a markedly better experience in understanding dialogue, especially when the person on TV is talking fast.”

Phonak’s TV Connector is also useful for those looking for a portable audio streaming solution. The USB-powered device can stream audio from laptops, MP3 players, and any other device with a headphone jack. Optical audio output is also supported.

Bluetooth Meets the World of Hearing Aids

While device-agnostic Bluetooth-enabled hands-free calls are nothing new in the world of consumer electronics, these are true innovations for the world of hearing aids. And Audéo B-Direct is still very much a hearing aid. Unlike traditional Bluetooth earpieces, the Audéo B-Direct delivers the customizable amplification for Bluetooth audio streams (tailored to the wearer’s unique hearing profile), and runs on Phonak’s AutoSense OS™ platform, which delivers better speech understanding for one-on-one and group conversations, in a variety of listening environments.

To find a licensed hearing professional who has been trained to fit the Audéo B-Direct hearing aids, visit Phonak’s website.

Over The Counter hearing aid development, update

The Over The Counter (OTC) hearing aid revolution has been developing rapidly over the past few years, and despite the objections put forth by the medical-model hearing aid industry and some Audiologist professional organizations, the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act of 2017 is now officially the law of the land. While most original equipment manufacturers are waiting on the FDA to define the new OTC hearing aid product category, some innovations are already quietly brewing. Project Ears, announced earlier, is a perfect example of a technology fusion that will lead the way for OTC product developers.

Project Ears: Mimi Meets Bragi

The Mimi Hearing Test has been winning awards for its hearing checking app since at least 2015. Regarded as one of the best hearing checking apps (currently available on iOS and Android), the Mimi Hearing Test has now checked over one million ears. Up to this point, the Mimi Hearing Test has been used primarily for driving hearing enhancement for music through Mimi’s affiliated app Mimi Music app.

Through a cutting edge collaboration with Bragi, the developer of the intelligent wireless “hearable” Bragi Dash, it looks as though the Mimi Hearing Test will now do much more than simply enhance the music listening experience of those with hearing loss. Project Ears promises to both enhance general hearing and provide tinnitus relief through a Bragi Dash like product that uses Mimi’s hearing checking technology to drive individualized amplification of sound and tinnitus masking sounds:

Making use of our in-ear computing technology and deep understanding of human machine interaction, we aim to create the world’s first intelligent sound amplifier with an embedded scientific hearing test.

Here’s how Project Ears defines their planned tinnitus masking technology:

Embedded masking sounds help you relax and forget the ringing in your ears by covering the tinnitus while you can still hear your surroundings.

While Bragi is reportedly developing a Personal Sound Amplification Product (PSAP) to deliver these technologies, incorporating a hearing check and personalized amplification (intended to enhance hearing for those suffering from hearing loss) would probably put it more in the realm of a OTC hearing aid than a PSAP. According to current draft guidance from the FDA, PSAPs are not meant to help those with hearing loss:

PSAPs are intended to amplify environmental sound for non-hearing impaired consumers. They are intended to accentuate sounds in specific listening environments, rather than for everyday use in multiple listening situations. They are not intended to compensate for hearing impairment or to address listening situations that are typically associated with and indicative of hearing loss.

The OTC hearing aid vs PSAP distinction aside, the Project Ears announcement was largely predictable. Bragi and Starkey Hearing (a medical-model hearing aid manufacturer) announced a partnership to develop a custom-fitted version of the Dash (dubbed Dash Pro) way back in January 2016.

Starkey Promotes the Bragi Partnership in a Tweet

At the time of Starkey’s announcement, Hearing Tracker predicted that the Bragi association would eventually lead to hearing aid technologies being incorporated into Bragi’s hearable devices. While Project Ears makes no mention of Starkey, a recent quote from Jason Galster, Starkey’s senior manager of audiology research, says it all:

There will be a convergence between what we view as a hearing aid and what we view as a hearable

Check out the video below for Bragi’s teaser announcement of Project Ears.

Project Ears Press Release

Want to know more about Project Ears? Visit the Project Ears site, or read on for the official press release, received this morning via email:

Las Vegas, UNITED STATES (January 8, 2018) – Bragi (www.bragi.com), the Kickstarter-launched company behind The World’s First Smart Hearable will showcase the latest in hearable technology at CES 2018 from January 9-12.

This includes the introduction of Project Ears, a collaboration between Bragi and Mimi Hearing Technologies to develop sound amplification and hearing enhancement solutions throughout 2018.

Project Ears is already in development and will focus on Personal Sound Amplification Products (PSAP) with on board soothing sounds that deliver the same design and feel of The Dash SeriesProject Ears will examine the possibilities of personalized hearing enhancement in a multitude of different settings including the home, office, jobsite and even outdoor sport environments.

“When we introduced The Dash in 2015, one of the unexpected pieces of feedback was a group of consumers using the device’s internal storage to treat tinnitus through white noise” said Bragi Founder & CEO Nikolaj Hviid. “This led us down the path to review and develop capabilities of our in-ear computing technologies to potentially offer hearing enhancement services.”

One of Project Ears immediate development successes is the integration of a pure tone threshold test (a hearing test) that users can take on-board to create their unique Earprint. By combining this with Mimi’s personalization technology, the hearing device will automatically configure and program itself to the individual without the assistance of a smartphone or manual programing to deliver the best sound enhancement, tailored specifically to their personal Earprint.

Currently, Project Ears is an open-ended possibility with potential use cases that could range from and are not limited to, protecting your ears from dangerously loud noise and utilizing state of the art hearing technologies that amplify your surroundings selectively and intelligently. Bragi and Mimi Hearing Technologies are also looking forward to introducing Mimi’s personalization software to the Dash series to deliver the ultimate music experience to users.

Based in Germany, Mimi Hearing Technologies is the world’s leading expert on sound personalization and creators of the Mimi Hearing Test App, one of the most advanced hearing tests on the market and a certified medical product in Europe. Having tested over one-million ears to date, Mimi defines the future of hearing and sound, pioneering cutting-edge technologies and developing the global standard in sound personalization.

“We are delighted to welcome Bragi as a new Mimi partner.” said Dr. Henrik Matthies, Managing Director for Mimi Hearing Technologies. “With its first products Bragi has already caused quite a stir in the music and audio markets. Without a doubt, the integration of Mimi’s unique sound personalization technology into Bragi’s innovative audio concept opens up a new dimension to the users’ listening and hearing experience.”

Your comments are welcome.

8 Tips For Hearing Loss Better Communication

Hearing loss can make conversations challenging. Often we rely on our conversation person to face us when they speak and provide us context before changing topics.

But communication is a two-way street. There are also many things we can do to enhance our ability to have successful and productive conversations with others. By following some simple rules of thumb, we can put ourselves in a better position to hear and communicate as best is possible.

Here are my tips. Please share yours in the comments.

1. Inform Others About Your Hearing Loss

Don’t be shy about disclosing your hearing loss. People cannot help you if they do not know you have difficulty understanding. I make a habit of announcing my hearing loss at the start of any group meetings or retreats. It is easy to do as part of the introductions. This way I get the information out and avoid any awkwardness later when I ask someone to repeat themselves or grab a seat in the front row so I can hear the speaker better.

2. Be Specific About Your Needs

Let others know what they can do to help you hear better. The more specific you are in your request, such as: I need you to sit on my left side or please face me when you speak to me — the more likely you are to get good results. Be prepared to remind people what they can do to help.

3. Put Others At Ease

If you appear comfortable with your hearing loss, others will be as well. Let people know that they can ask you about it. I often joke with people saying, “If you say something to me and I don’t answer, please don’t think I am rude, it is probably because I didn’t hear, or understand you.” Humor often makes people more forgiving  and more willing to try again to engage you in conversation.

4. Stay Informed

Since context is so important in following conversations, try to stay abreast of current news and social happenings. It is easier to understand a new name (of a country or a celebrity) if you have seen it written about recently. This can be especially important if you are traveling to a different state or country.

5. Maintain Good Energy

Hearing may require extraordinary concentration for those with hearing loss so it is important to approach communication situations well rested and alert. Eat healthy food, exercise regularly, and be sure to get enough sleep. Also, don’t be afraid to take breaks from communication if you are getting tired.

6. Interrupt for Clarification In Moderation

If you miss a word or two of a story, listen a little bit longer before jumping in with “What?” You may be able to piece together what was said after another sentence or two. This does not apply at the doctor, or other important situation where full knowledge is imperative, but in social situations, not following every detail is probably OK some of the time. Also, when  you ask for clarification, say what you think you heard to minimize what the speaker needs to repeat.

7. Use Non-Verbal Clues To Guide Your Communication Partner

Cupping your hand behind your ear is a good way to ask the speaker to raise his voice without interrupting the flow of the conversation. Leaning closer to the speaker can also indicate that you are having trouble hearing them.

8. Go With The Flow

Manage your expectations. In certain situations, understanding every word may not be not possible, but try to be grateful for what you can hear. Keep your sense of humor ready for the misunderstandings. Some of them can be quite funny if you let them.

If you have any suggestion, please leave them under comments.

Everything you want to know about EarMolds