Decrease hearing loss risk, EAT MORE FISH

A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found a strong connection between eating two or more servings of some fish per week and a decreased risk of hearing loss.

Researchers analyzed almost two decades’ of data from 65,215 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study II. In the study, women self-reported on their diet, as well as about hearing loss, among many other things.

In this prospective study among 65,215 US women, we observed a lower risk of hearing loss among women who consumed 2 or more servings of fish per week. Consumption of any specific type of fish (tuna, dark-meat fish, light-meat fish, or shellfish) tended to be associated with lower risk. In addition, higher intake of long-chain omega-3 (fatty acids) PUFAs was inversely associated with risk. These findings suggest that diet may be important in the pathogenesis of preventing or reducing hearing loss.

Evidence suggests regular fish consumption (1–2 servings per week) may protect against several diseases, such as coronary artery disease (40), sudden cardiac death (41), ischemic stroke (21), atrial fibrillation (42), cognitive decline (43), and dementia (44). The proposed benefits of fish intake may be attributable in large part to the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids that fish provide. Finfish and shellfish are the chief dietary sources of the major long-chain omega-3 PUFAs, EPA (20:5n−3) and DHA (22:6n−3), often referred to as “marine” fatty acids. Intake is particularly essential for DHA, because it cannot be synthesized appreciably after infancy (45). DHA appears to be important during auditory neuro-development, and higher dietary intake of DHA in breast milk or supplemented formula during early infancy is associated with accelerated maturation of auditory brainstem response latencies (4647).

To read  the entire study click here  http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/100/5/1371.full

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